A Business in the Community Initiative

BAME Women in the UK

Executive Summary / Introduction

 

2010 is a milestone in the journey of Race for Opportunity (RfO), a campaign that was established by Business in the Community (BITC) in 1995 as a vehicle to promote and progress race equality in the workplace.
In celebration of RfO’s 15th year anniversary we have taken this opportunity to recognise and acknowledge the achievements and progress of black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) women in the UK, from school through to the workplace.
This factsheet gives a simple snapshot of BAME women in the UK today and demonstrates that these women are playing an active role in all walks of life, although their representation at the most senior levels of management still remains at unacceptable low levels.
With women accounting for half of the UK workforce, there is clearly a need for employers to maximise the use of this talent.
The key elements of race equality continue to be leadership and progression and one of the challenges ahead is to ensure that Britain’s most senior positions are open equally to women of all ethnic groups. 
 
 
Sandra Kerr, OBE. 
National Campaign Director, 
Business in the Community's Race for Opportunity

 

Population Facts
The national Census 2001 recorded the UK’s non-white population as 4.6 million, or 7.9% of the total population. More recent statistics from ONS record the overall ethnic minority population for England as 11.32%.
 
The UK’s non-white population as 4.6 million, or 7.9% of the total population. More recent statistics from ONS record the overall ethnic minority population for England as 11.32%.
Population wise, females make up 51% of the UK population – that’s 31 million females compared with 29.9 million males in the UK population.
In England alone, 11.6% of all women are from a BAME group and constitute 5.6% of the total population. 
11.6% of all women are from a BAME group and constitute 5.6% of the total population.
Source: Government Equalities Office (GEO) factsheet February 2009 derived from ONS experimental Population Estimates by Ethnic Group in England for 2006, published in 2008
 
Over two thirds of all working-age ethnic minorities are concentrated in London, West Midlands Metropolitan, East Midlands, West Yorkshire and Greater Manchester, with 43% concentrated in London alone. 
43% concentrated in London alone.
The picture is almost mirrored for working-age ethnic minority women where 38.5% are based in London, followed by West Midlands 15% and just under 10% in Yorkshire and the Humber, East Midlands and the South East.
38.5% are based in London, followed by West Midlands 15% and just under 10% in Yorkshire and the Humber, East Midlands and the South East.
 

The Full Story

This research piece sets the scene for BAME women in the UK by first taking a look at overall population statistics and then the employment gap between ethnic minority women and women overall. Followed by an examination of ethnic minority women's education the research moves on to give 'at a glance' reports a varied selection of workplace sectors and then culminates with the journeys of lead mentors from the RfO mentoring circle initiative.